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The Search for Meaning

 I was never pushed into religion, I waded in all on my own at a young age. It took me until I was 22 to wade back out. 

So for me it was a natural progression in my search for meaning. Now I look to philosophy and physics. When I look back at my former beliefs it’s like remembering when I believed in Santa.

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